Options saved.

'; } $checked = ''; if($ping == 1) $checked = 'checked="checked"'; echo '

URIs to Ping

The following services will automatically be pinged/notified when you publish posts. Not when you edit previously published posts, as WordPress does by default.

NB: this list is synchronized with the original update services list.

Separate multiple service URIs with line breaks:

Ping log

These are the lastest actions performed by the plugin.


'; } # telling WordPress to ping if the post is new, but not if it's just been edited function SUP_ping_if_new($id) { global $wpdb, $post_title; if(get_option('SUP_ping') == 1 and get_option('ping_sites') != "") { # fetches data directly from database; the function "get_post" is cached, # and using it here will get the post as is was before the last save $row = mysql_fetch_array(mysql_query( "SELECT post_date,post_modified FROM $wpdb->posts WHERE id=$id")); # if time when created equals time when modified it is a new post, # otherwise the author has edited/modified it if($row["post_date"] == $row["post_modified"]) { if($post_title) SUP_log("Pinging services (new post: “".$post_title."”) ..."); else SUP_log("Pinging services (new post) ..."); SUP_ping_services(); # Try commenting the line above, and uncommenting this line below # if pinging seems to be out of order. Please notify the author if it helps! # generic_ping(); } else { if($post_title) SUP_log("NOT pinging services (“".$post_title."” was edited)"); else SUP_log("NOT pinging services (a post was edited)"); } } else SUP_log("NOT pinging services (disabled by administrator)"); } # More or less a copy of WP's "generic_ping" from functions.php, # but uses another function to send the actual XML-RPC messages. function SUP_ping_services() { $services = get_settings('ping_sites'); $services = preg_replace("|(\s)+|", '$1', $services); // Kill dupe lines $services = trim($services); if ( '' != $services ) { $services = explode("\n", $services); foreach ($services as $service) SUP_send_xmlrpc($service); } } # A slightly modified version of the WordPress built-in ping functionality ("weblog_ping" in functions.php). # This one uses correct extendedPing format (WP does not), and logs response from service. function SUP_send_xmlrpc($server = '', $path = '') { global $wp_version; include_once (ABSPATH . WPINC . '/class-IXR.php'); // using a timeout of 3 seconds should be enough to cover slow servers $client = new IXR_Client($server, ((!strlen(trim($path)) || ('/' == $path)) ? false : $path)); $client->timeout = 3; $client->useragent .= ' -- WordPress/'.$wp_version; // when set to true, this outputs debug messages by itself $client->debug = false; $home = trailingslashit( get_option('home') ); # the extendedPing format should be "blog name", "blog url", "check url" (whatever that is), and "feed url", # but it would seem as if the standard has been mixed up. it's therefore best to repeat the feed url. if($client->query('weblogUpdates.extendedPing', get_settings('blogname'), $home, get_bloginfo('rss2_url'), get_bloginfo('rss2_url'))) { SUP_log("- ".$server." was successfully pinged (extended format)"); } else { # pinging was unsuccessful, trying regular ping format if($client->query('weblogUpdates.ping', get_settings('blogname'), $home)) { SUP_log("- ".$server." was successfully pinged"); } else { SUP_log("- ".$server." could not be pinged. Error message: “".$client->error->message."”"); } } } $post_title = ""; # Receives the title of the post from a filter below function SUP_post_title($title) { global $post_title; $post_title = $title; return $title; } # ----- # Log stuff $logfile = ABSPATH."wp-content/smart-update-pinger.log"; # for debugging function SUP_log($line) { global $logfile; $fh = @fopen($logfile, "a"); @fwrite($fh, strftime("%D %T")."\t$line\n"); @fclose($fh); } function SUP_get_last_log_entries($num) { global $logfile; $lines = @file($logfile); if($lines === false) return "Error reading log file (".$logfile."). This could mean that the wp-content directory is write-protected and no log data can be saved, that you have manually removed the log file, or that you have recently upgraded the plugin."; else { $lines = array_slice($lines, count($lines) - $num); $msg = ""; foreach($lines as $line) $msg .= trim($line)."
"; return $msg; } } # ----- # adds a filter to receive the title of the post before publishing add_filter("title_save_pre", "SUP_post_title"); # adds some hooks # shows the options in the administration panel add_action("admin_menu", "SUP_add_options_page"); # calls SUP_ping whenever a post is published add_action("publish_post", "SUP_ping_if_new"); # calls SUP_ping_draft when changing the status from private/draft to published # add_action("private_to_published', 'SUP_ping_draft'); # removes the "WordPress official" pinging hook remove_action("publish_post", "generic_ping"); # activates pinging if setting doesn't exist in database yet # (before the user has changed the settings the first time) if(get_option("SUP_ping") === false) { update_option("SUP_ping", 1); } ?>  My LifeLock » Identity Theft Protection - Stop Identity Theft

ID Theft - How Identity Theft Occurs

June 20th, 2007 | A Customer | Prevent ID Theft

Despite your best efforts to manage the flow of your personal information or to keep it to yourself, skilled identity thieves may use a variety of methods - low- and hi-tech - to gain access to your data. Here are some of the ways imposters can get your personal information and take over your identity.

How identity thieves get your personal information:

  • They steal wallets and purses containing your identification and credit and bank cards.
  • They steal your mail, including your bank and credit card statements, pre-approved credit offers, telephone calling cards and tax information.
  • They complete a “change of address form” to divert your mail to another location.
  • They rummage through your trash, or the trash of businesses, for personal data in a practice known as “dumpster diving.”
  • They fraudulently obtain your credit report by posing as a landlord, employer or someone else who may have a legitimate need for — and a legal right to — the information.
  • They get your business or personnel records at work.
  • They find personal information in your home.
  • They use personal information you share on the Internet.
  • They buy your personal information from “inside” sources. For example, an identity thief may pay a store employee for information about you that appears on an application for goods, services or credit.

How identity thieves use your personal information:

  • They call your credit card issuer and, pretending to be you, ask to change the mailing address on your credit card account. The imposter then runs up charges on your account. Because your bills are being sent to the new address, it may take some time before you realize there’s a problem.
  • They open a new credit card account, using your name, date of birth and SSN. When they use the credit card and don’t pay the bills, the delinquent account is reported on your credit report.
  • They establish phone or wireless service in your name.
  • They open a bank account in your name and write bad checks on that account.
  • They file for bankruptcy under your name to avoid paying debts they’ve incurred under your name, or to avoid eviction.
  • They counterfeit checks or debit cards, and drain your bank account.
  • They buy cars by taking out auto loans in your name.
Courtesy of the FTC.

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